Saturday, September 14, 2019

Getting Grilled

I received an captivating email last month from an author asking if I was interested in reviewing his latest book. As I perused the email I soon discovered that it was an automotive related book, and one about classic cars to boot! Right up my alley to say the least so I was really anticipating checking it out.

The book in question is titled Great Grilles of the '50s written by Mark Misercola and Hank Kaczmarek. In brief, I was told that it is "a coffee table retrospective that provides the stories behind the designs of some of the most iconic front grilles from Detroit’s golden era of design, including the 1953 Olds Fiesta, 1952 Packard Caribbean, 1957 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer and the ‘57 DeSoto Fireflite. It also has a chapter on Dagmar bumpers." What I actually discovered was a whole lot more...

First off, this is not one of those outlandishly sized coffee table books that is almost the size of the table! In my humble opinion, it is perfectly sized and also fits well in my book shelf, not that it is going to be there anytime soon. The vast majority of the photographs are color with the few exceptions being the period black and whites. Don't let the title fool you either, this is not just a compilation of classic automobile grilles. In between the hardback covers, the pages are chocked full of information pertaining to each model, from "Fast Facts" and a "Grille Tech Sheet", to options and current values. There is even a paint code/color chart for each car! How cool is that? I have a feeling that this book is going to take up permanent residence on my coffee table.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book! Plus, it also doubles as a great reference for facts and figures on the particular cars. This is a must have for every collector car enthusiast old and young alike and you can order your very own copy by clicking right HERE.

After you get your copy and before you get too absorbed in it, turn to page 49. Gracing that page is my favorite photo in the book and a car that is on my personal bucket list, a 1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer. This car is a rolling piece of virtual art that would have Charles Phoenix, the Ambassador of Americana saying "Yes ladies and gentlemen, this is the all new for 1959 Custom Royal Lancer by Dodge, behold the glory!" Special thanks to Mark Misercola for contacting me about his book and M.T. Publishing Company for providing the copy.

Sunday, August 25, 2019

Russia Collusion is Alive and Well

BREAKING NEWS: Frank's Classic Car Blog indicted on multiple counts of Russian collusion, Amberlight Garage seized for evidence!

Yes folks it's true, I was caught "red" handed, no Soviet pun intended. The counts in question are the top 15 and number 2 to be specific. There is also email evidence, so I suppose the warehouse housing my massive, liquid cooled servers will also be seized! But before you go believing this fake news, let me explain first.

I received an interesting email earlier this month from a Russian bot... er, I mean from a web site Project Manager. The agent, oops, I mean the Manager informed me that Frank's Classic Car Blog has been included for Russia's Top 15 Most Popular Car Blogs. See, there is the 15 reference. But what about the number 2 you ask? Well good readers, that is where this very blog placed on their hit list. Did I say hit list? I meant list, just plain list...

Apparently the new home of the Amberlight Garage

Friday, March 1, 2019

FranktoidTM No. 20 - If Books Could Talk

What if books could talk? I'm not talking audio books here, but pulp and ink, hold in your hands physical books. With the ever increasing popularity of the internet one might think that print is dead, but I am here to tell you that it is nowhere near being put in a pine box. I have to admit I am a bit of a bibliophile when it come to automotive books. My love for ink on paper lies between vintage vehicle repair manuals and collector car reference books, but just about anything automotive gets my attention. I was lucky enough to score a first edition Motor's Manual recently in almost perfect condition.


Because books are so physical I think they have more meaning then something you would read electronically. Case in point, addressing a book to someone or writing a personal greeting in it. I usually check the inner flap of books that I am interested in and occasionally there will be something written in there. What a person has written can really make you stop and think. Was this someone's favorite book or a gift? Did the owner pass away and it was donated? Were they even aware that something was written in it? These personalized words are pieces of a puzzle that will never be completed but they were all somebody's property at one time and obviously meant something to them. If that book could talk, what would it say?
Words are simplistically powerful.